Nicola Kirk: Author and Collector of Paranormal Stories and Other Strange Encounters

Posts tagged ‘EVP’

Did That Just Say What I Think It Did?

In my last post, I mentioned that I had once recorded some very curious sounds coming from the depths of a deserted bunker close to where I used to live.  You can hear me tramping about through the piles of leaves that coated the floor, but when I stand still and pan the camera around you can hear some clear knocking sounds echoing around.  I didn’t hear them at the time but… well, if you have any ideas what could have been making the noise, I would be interested to hear your thoughts in the comments section at the end of this post.  It could have been the sounds of a very old building shifting but then… it could be the restless spirit of Demented Bob seeking out his next prey.  But on a serious note, EVPs (Electronic Voice Phenomena) can be very interesting to listen to and some of them, as you will see at the bottom of this post, are very creepy indeed.

How hard is it to catch an EVP?  If you go by what you see on the television, we are permanently surrounded by the voices of the dead who are all hissing at us to ‘GET OUT!’, advising you that they are going to ‘KILL YOU!’ or, if they’re having a good day, they might just say your name in a nice whispery voice, just so you know you’re being observed while you creep about in the dark.  Is it possible to catch a clear EVP without having to do all the tweaking and clarifying that some ghost hunters seem to have to do when they make a programme?  One paranormal programme advised ‘spirit voices speak twice as fast as human voices so we need to slow them down to be able to hear them clearly.’  But… I’m pretty sure people have managed to record some pretty spectacular EVPs without having to mess about with them like that?

And so…I have decided to do a bit of my own EVP experimenting to see what I might come up with.

Now, I appreciate that it could be a long time before I come up with something that could possibly resemble a convincing EVP.  As it goes, I embarked on a bit of EVPing the other evening after I’d been out to dinner with my husband… but I couldn’t stop giggling so I had to write that one off as a somewhat ‘contaminated’ recording.  Either that or the paranormal world found me exceedingly amusing that night.

So, while I have a bit of a delve into the world of EVPs for myself, I have also been having a delve into the internet’s catalogue of EVPs to see what sort of things might be out there.  One that I found particularly haunting (excuse the pun) was this one.  Every time I watch it, it makes my hair stand up on end, I think it’s brilliant:

The Haunted Hotel Room

And then there was this one, which, fake or not, still induces a shiver:

Wogans Cavern at Pembroke Castle

If you have any EVPs you would like to share, please do.

Nicola

©Nicola Kirk 2016 and www.nicolakirk.wordpress.com

Advertisements

BACK SEAT GHOSTBUSTING – THE PRE-INVESTIGATION -PART 1

Ghost Busting: Alas, it’s never like the films…

The other week I was fortunate enough to be invited to a paranormal investigation, purely as an observer, but it was a treat nonetheless – these events generally are.  I have changed the names of people and places to respect their privacy (and so they can’t hunt me down and lob rotten vegetables at me) but, at the end of the day, it is the experience itself that matters, isn’t it?  And for this particular experience, if I was to play some theme music to it, the Benny Hill theme would suit it down to the ground.

My good friend, Sally, is the curator of a rather nice museum and she had been approached by a paranormal group, let’s call them… Almost Haunted, and was asked if they could investigate.  Sally agreed that they could.  A few weeks before the actual investigation, Almost Haunted‘s medium, (ummm, let’s call her Flossie) and one of her technical chaps had popped along for a pre-investigation investigation.  During this pre-investigation, Flossie and her colleague had a brief wander around the museum while it was still daylight and the medium declared she was in touch with the spirit of a young boy of about six years old called Robert.  She said Robert particularly liked the area of the museum that was full of 1970s artefacts but he was annoyed that Sally had recently moved a clock that had been sitting on top of a television there.  Why that particular item being moved would bother a child considering that the contents of the museum are changed and swapped around on a regular basis, I don’t know.  However, Sally was a little surprised by this piece of information because she had indeed moved the clock.  When she was alone, Sally had a closer inspection of the area around the clock to see if there were any tell-tale dust marks that might have indicated to Flossie that the clock had been moved, but she couldn’t see anything.  A lucky guess, perhaps?  Who knows?

Where’s Casper when you need him?  At least he was chatty…

Another spirit that Flossie picked up on at the museum was  a Victorian looking woman called Emily who was apparently stuck on what Flossie referred to as a ‘loop’, meaning she was carrying out the same task again and again.  Flossie said that the woman was ‘extremely busy’ and didn’t have time to stop and talk because she had people to feed.  Furthermore, there was also a rather unpleasant spirit  called George who was dressed as a farrier.  George was not keen on the little boy, Robert, perhaps because Robert sounded like a bit of a brat.

As well as running the museum, Sally also has the use of an old house nearby where she keeps excess artefacts.  She refers to the house as ‘the store’.  I’ve been to the store myself a few times, and although it does have a bit of a musty smell to it, no carpets and an air of long disuse, there’s nothing particularly horrible about it, but I suppose the sheer fact that a house is unlived in is sometimes enough to give it an uncomfortable atmosphere and Sally particularly hates having to go in there alone.  She told me that she was once downstairs working away in what was once the living room when she heard distinct footsteps coming from the room above her.  She was completely alone at the time.   Yup, feel those hairs rising on the back of your neck, ladies and gentlemen…

During the brief tour around the store in August, Flossie said that she didn’t like Room 1, which is just on the left as you walk in (the old living room).  In Room 2, just behind Room 1, which is currently full of old uniforms and tunics, the medium said she sensed a man called Ted who was dressed in what she thought was some kind of railway uniform.  Upstairs, she found a little girl who liked to play with Robert at times – Robert had apparently followed Flossie and Sally over from the museum to the store, and the little girl liked to watch Sally and her colleagues working sometimes – not creepy at all…

Ghostly Footsteps: Who was stalking Sally at ‘the store’?

Moving  upstairs to Room 5, Flossie discovered the spirit of a chap called Edward who was also on a ‘loop’, sitting at a desk, busy slaving over some accounts.  Now, is it just me, or does there seem to be an incredible abundance of ghosts running amok in the museum and store?  It seems to be packed to the rafters with all things dead and who are too busy to stop and chat.

Flossie’s technical assistant took some photos while they were there but unfortunately they failed to show anything of interest, and the EVP recordings (electronic voice phenomena) were sadly blank too.  Again, I find myself wondering that if there were that many ghosts/spirits/whatever you want to call them, all floating around the place, surely one of them might be a little bit interested in making an appearance on film or voice recorder? But no, not so much as a peep from mischievous little Robert or the ever busy Emily.  It would appear that, mediums aside, no matter how many spooks are allegedly crammed into your abode, getting them to appear or stop for a chat is a mission impossible.  You’d have thought the dead would relish the chance to scare the pants off the living.  I know I would, but then I’m a bit evil like that.

During an EVP session the voice recorder turned off after about 30 minutes and Flossie declared that the batteries had been mysteriously ‘drained’, although Sally suspected the batteries may have just died of natural causes because she had overheard Flossie asking one of her technical chaps earlier if they had remembered their voice recorder – possibly because Flossie’s batteries weren’t very fresh to begin with and she was worried they might die during the preliminary investigation.  Which they did.

Why doesn’t it work? Try new batteries…

At this point my imagination was beginning to run riot over what the actual investigation in October was going to be like…

But I’ll have to tell you all about the official investigation in the second part of this post.

Nicola

©Nicola Kirk and http://www.nicolakirk.wordpress.com 2010

Clowning Around – Ghoulishly Good Fun

Coulrophobia is the irrational fear of clowns (and yes, I realise the above picture is not going to do people who are terrified of Mr Chuckles the Clown any favours whatsoever but… I’m a bit evil like that).  It’s quite a common phobia it would seem; so common, in fact, that in July 2006 at a three day music festival held at Robin Hill, Isle of Wight, organisers were forced to withdraw a request for festival goers to attend dressed as clowns because many of the revellers were terrified of them.  It’s a strange phobia to suffer from, especially when you consider the innocent origins of clowning around.

Joseph Grimaldi (1778-1837) is considered to be the original clown (so all you people out there frightened of a bit of greasepaint and hideous fuzzy wigs, Joseph is the man to blame).  Grimaldi enjoyed an exciting career in theatre and could often be seen bounding around the stage at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, throwing himself about like a rag doll to the audience’s delight whilst wearing gaudy outfits and with his face painted white.

Before:  Mr Grimaldi practises the art of being serious.

After: Oh, and it’s all gone horribly wrong…

Unfortunately, Grimaldi’s punishing theatrical routines crippled him and he was forced to prematurely retire from the job he loved.  By 1818 he was penniless and in his final speech at a benefit performance (in which he was forced to perform seated because of his poor health), he told his audience:

“Like vaulting ambition, I have overleaped myself and pay the penalty in advanced old age. It is four years since I jumped my last jump, filched my last oyster, boiled my last sausage and set in for retirement.”

Grimaldi died in 1837 at 33 Southampton Street (now called Calshot Street), Clerkenwell at the age of 58.  There is an interesting story that Grimaldi asked for his head to be removed before being buried at what is now called Grimaldi Park, Pentonville Road.  No one is entirely sure why Grimaldi asked for this to be done, but seeing as his father was so terrified of being buried alive that he asked for his head to be sawn off before being buried, perhaps some of that terror rubbed off on his son and beheading before interment appeared to be the sensible thing to do…


Joseph Grimaldi’s Grave,
Grimaldi Park, Pentonville Road

For most people, death is pretty much the final curtain, but Joseph Grimaldi doesn’t quite see it that way and has refused to remain quiet in his grave.  At the Theatre Royal people have frequently reported receiving a phantom kick up the backside when Grimaldi wants to get their attention.  From actors on stage to usherettes, it would seem that no one is safe.  Also, we mustn’t forget the strange, pasty white disembodied face that has also been reported hovering around the theatre.  As I have no idea where Grimaldi’s head ended up, I wonder if maybe a sympathetic friend arranged for his head to be secreted somewhere in the theatre he loved so much, hence its strange spectral appearences.  Who knows?

Below is a short video of ghost hunter, Chris Halton, attempting to get Joseph Grimaldi into a chatty mood:

Nicola

weirdworld@hotmail.co.uk

©Nicola Kirk and http://www.nicolakirk.wordpress.com 2010

Sources:

Wikipedia – Coulrophobia

Haunted London

Wikipedia – Joseph Grimaldi

The Guardian

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: